Recent Preservation Activities

Longtime CAMP member Colonel Hal Youmans has launched an exciting new initiative.  His vision is to survey news about historic preservation and prepare a periodic summary.  This new product will be useful both to professionals and hobbyists who share our interests.

We welcome feedback and input.


San Francisco, California. – The Partners in Preservation is a joint program sponsored by American Express and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. On  November 13, 2018, American Express announced a $450,000 grant to three non-military sites in San Francisco. Citing their unique cultural heritage, the Doolan-Larson building (1903), noted for its counter-culture activities in Haight Ashbury during the 1960s, Nihonmachi Little Friends, a childcare center in Japantown housed in a pre-WW II structure, and the Roxie Theater in the Mission District shared the grant.  Nihonmachi and the Roxie received previous grants.

Since its inception in 2006, Partners in Preservation has pledged more than $22 million in support of over 200 historic sites in the USA. Its goal is “to increase the public’s awareness of the importance of historic preservation in the United States and to preserve America’s historic and cultural places.”  Competition is stiff.  For information on the nomination and selection process contact: For American Express, Ms. Amelia T. Woltering (212-640-7034; or amelia.t.woltering@aexp.com);  and for the National Trust, Ms. Germonique R. Ulmer (202-588-6475; or gulmer@savingplaces.org). FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS Business Wire, November 13, 2018.

Submitted by Col. Hal Youmans (The Persistent Preservationist)

Posted January 2019

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. – Gettysburg National Military Park, the site of the deadliest battle fought within the United States, is literally falling apart.  This Fall the acting superintendent of the Park reported an estimated $55.5 million deferred, or backlog, maintenance shortfall.  Roads ($16.2 million), the area around the iconic Little Round Top ($16.0 million), and historic buildings on site ($11.0 million) are at the top of the list.  Little hope is given to a $6.5 million stopgap bipartisan bill now in the U.S. Senate.  The funds are for the National Park Service and nothing is said as to where the Service will allocate these meager funds.

Neither appropriated budgets or visitor’s fees and purchases are enough to even maintain the Park or enhance it’s presentations.  Each year hard decisions have to be made to prepare the park for visitors. An additional factor not often recognized is that today locally 923 jobs are related to Park operations.  This is a major impact on the surrounding communities.  National Park Service deferred maintenance estimates nationwide are astronomical. (Editor’s comment: Perhaps the new Congress will focus on infrastructure and at the same time include funds to protect and preserve military historical sites in its appropriations.) FROM WHTM-TV, ABC-27, Harrisburg Pa., Newsfeed, November 1, 2018.

Submitted by Col. Hal Youmans (The Persistent Preservationist)

Posted January 2019

Greenwood, South Carolina. –  In November 2018 the National Endowment for the Humanities awarded a grant to Lander University’s College of Behavioral and Social Sciences to host a symposium of World War I’s effects on the South. The two-day event, March 14-15, 2019, in Greenwood entitled:  “Time of Tradition and Transition: A Symposium on the South and World War I,”  will include panel and plenary sessions on wide-ranging topics, including military planning.

Participants will include noted academics as well as South Carolina citizen-advocates in public conversations about a local war memorials, commemorations, and historic preservation. The sponsor hopes to highlight how World War I impacted the South and to promote local history. Further information is available by contacting the sponsors at 864-388-8176. – FROM The Index Journal, Greenwood, SC, November 6, 2018.

Submitted by Col. Hal Youmans (The Persistent Preservationist)

Posted January 2019

Seattle, Washington. – A battle is raging in Seattle. According to the November 2018 issue of Seattle Magazine, “The Preservationists,” identified influential groups like “Vanishing Seattle” and “Historic Seattle,” are locked in verbal combat with those in the city bent on demolition and displacement of some of the city’s most historic sites and buildings.  The City Council is engaged with proposals to provide $500,000 in seed money to acquire, restore, and preserve historic properties in the city.

Local advocates know that Seattle was the site of early attempts at racial integration of military and civilian work forces by the U.S. Navy during World War II.  Working with the Seattle Housing Authority the Navy created workplaces, neighborhoods, schools and community centers on a completely non-discrimination basis. Several of the remaining sites including the Decatur Annex have been nominated for landmark status. That status will protect the site from the demolition balls.  Hearing were held in late November.  Watch this column for updates.  FROM The  Capitol Hill Times, Seattle, WA,  November 7, 2018.

Submitted by Col. Hal Youmans (The Persistent Preservationist)

Posted January 2019

Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada. – History is where you find it. This Georgian Bay city had a digital preservation day on November 4, 2018.  Members and descendents of the Royal Canadian Legion are justly proud of their military efforts during World War I and II. While many of the participants have passed, the descendents maintain, sometimes unwittingly, treasure troves of letters, souvenirs, and other artifacts supplementing official records at the more formal national and regional archival centers.

Such was the experience of the Koepke family at the Billy Bishop Home: Museum, Archives and National Historic Site in this city recently.  Their veteran, the grandfather of the visitor, left letters, Christmas cards, troop menus, and other artifacts describing his personal experiences during World War I.  These items together with the formal records of their grandfather’s service expanded the family’s and the nation’s knowledge of his valor and service. Directors at the Billy Bishop Home are planning future special exhibits in honor of Canadian forces at Normandy on D-Day 1944 and doing more research on the Owen Sound training site for elements of the Polish Army during World War II. National historic sites in Canada play an important role in military preservation world.  FROM  The Own Sun Times, Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada, November 4, 2018.

Submitted by Col. Hal Youmans (The Persistent Preservationist)

Posted January 2019

Fayetteville, North Carolina. – One cannot get more history and evidence of historical preservation efforts than through a visit to this North Carolina city and its adjacent military installation, Fort Bragg.  Downtown hosts the 1832 Old Market House, saved by the local Woman’s Club of Fayetteville in 1906. The Cape Fear and Yadkin Valley Railroad Depot, another protected structure, hosts a museum focusing on transportation, especially the robust and almost forgotten steamboat trade on the Cape Fear River.  Near the North Carolina Veterans Park is the privately-funded Airborne & Special Operations Museum.

Military preservationists and traditionalists can only marvel at the efforts on Fort Bragg. Billing itself as “The Home of the Airborne,” this large post also houses museums and sites honoring the roles played by soldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division and those trained in special operations and unconventional warfare. The “All-American Division” is traced from its activation in 1917 though World War II, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf War, and the present efforts against terrorism.  Unconventional warfare units certainly evolved since their use in the 18th century French and Indian War.  Fayetteville and Fort Bragg – a “must-stop” for the military preservationists. FROM Your Editor’s November 2018 visit.

Submitted by Col. Hal Youmans (The Persistent Preservationist)

Posted January 2019